Our Planetary Cathedral on Fire

by Margaret Bullitt-Jonas


8/2/2019

Cathedral of Notre Dame on fire. Photo credit: Nivenn Lanos on Unsplash
Shocked and helpless, I watched the live-stream as Notre Dame Cathedral went up in flames. Fire spread across the roof and the church’s mighty spire toppled and fell. Crowds gathered in Paris that spring night to weep and pray, to sing hymns and bear witness. Meanwhile, hundreds of fire fighters struggled to extinguish the fire, and another hundred removed artwork and sacred relics. I felt as if I were holding my breath with millions of others around the world as we waited to learn the fate of what some people consider a spiritual and cultural treasure.

Firefighters risking everything eventually brought the flames under control, and, some twelve hours after it began, the fire was snuffed out. We awoke the next morning to study the ruins and to give thanks for what was still standing: bell towers, pipe organs, and rose windows.

Rebuilding began.

But Notre Dame is not the world’s only holy place: every culture has equally precious places that mediate the transcendent. Every mosque and temple is sacred, every shrine and synagogue, and every storefront church.  And so, too, are the lands and waters of indigenous peoples sacred. Where is the protest and grief as these lands are destroyed?

The fire in Notre Dame – literally, “Our Lady” – is over. But the fire on Mother Earth rages on. Read more

The Rev. Dr. Margaret Bullitt-Jonas is the non-stipendiary Missioner for Creation Care for both the Episcopal Diocese of Western Massachusetts and the Massachusetts Conference, United Church of Christ.​

Margaret Bullitt-Jonas



We invite users of this website to post comments in response to posts published here. In order to maintain a respectful community, we insist that comments be polite, respectful and tolerant of opposing viewpoints. We reserve the right to remove comments that are hostile, hateful or abusive to others, or that constitute personal attacks. In the interest of transparency, we highly recommend that users comment using their full names. For those who feel a need for more anonymity, however, we will allow posts using first names and last initial.

comments powered by Disqus